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VAFB commemorates POW/MIA

Chief Master Sgt. Daryl Hogan, 30th Space Wing command chief, leads the way, carrying the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action flag, during the first lap around the track at the POW/ MIA Remembrance Ceremony Sept. 17, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The ceremony began with a motorcade, followed by a ceremonial presentation of the POW/ MIA flag and speeches by Vandenberg AFB leadership. After the ceremony, members from across the installation participated in a 24-hour walk or ruck while carrying the POW/ MIA flag, as well as a continuous 24-hour name reading of the past and current POW/MIA members, until the closing ceremony the next day.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Chief Master Sgt. Daryl Hogan, 30th Space Wing command chief, leads the way, carrying the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action flag, during the first lap around the track at the POW/ MIA Remembrance Ceremony Sept. 17, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The ceremony began with a motorcade, followed by a ceremonial presentation of the POW/ MIA flag and speeches by Vandenberg AFB leadership. After the ceremony, members from across the installation participated in a 24-hour walk or ruck while carrying the POW/ MIA flag, as well as a continuous 24-hour name reading of the past and current POW/MIA members, until the closing ceremony the next day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Airman 1st Class Allen Rouse, 30th Civil Engineer Squadron heating, ventilation and air conditioning specialist, runs with the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action flag during the 24- hour POW/MIA remembrance event Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The 24-hour walk or ruck, signifies the countless hours they spent surviving or devising plans to escape. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Airman 1st Class Allen Rouse, 30th Civil Engineer Squadron heating, ventilation and air conditioning specialist, runs with the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action flag during the 24- hour POW/MIA remembrance event Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The 24-hour walk or ruck, signifies the countless hours they spent surviving or devising plans to escape. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Members hold flags during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Remembrance Ceremony Sept. 17, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Members from across base and the local community came together to remember and celebrate the lives of POW and MIA members. The first POW/MIA ceremony was held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., after becoming an official recognition day in 1979. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, roughly 83,114 Americans from over five wars are missing in action, and 16,837 Americans died as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Members hold flags during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Remembrance Ceremony Sept. 17, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Members from across base and the local community came together to remember and celebrate the lives of POW and MIA members. The first POW/MIA ceremony was held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., after becoming an official recognition day in 1979. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, roughly 83,114 Americans from over five wars are missing in action, and 16,837 Americans died as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Members participate in a ceremonial presentation of the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action flag during the POW/MIA Remembrance Ceremony Sept. 17, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The first POW/MIA ceremony was held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., after becoming an official recognition day in 1979. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, roughly 83,114 Americans from over five wars went missing in action, and 16,837 Americans died as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Members participate in a ceremonial presentation of the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action flag during the POW/MIA Remembrance Ceremony Sept. 17, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The first POW/MIA ceremony was held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., after becoming an official recognition day in 1979. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, roughly 83,114 Americans from over five wars went missing in action, and 16,837 Americans died as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

A motorcade makes their way to the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Remembrance Ceremony Sept. 17, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. After the motorcade, Vandenberg AFB leadership gave speeches and a ceremonial presentation of the POW/ MIA flag. . Following the ceremony, members across the installation participated in a 24-hour walk or ruck while carrying the POW/ MIA flag, as well as a continuous 24-hour name reading of the past and current POW/MIA members, until the closing ceremony the next day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

A motorcade makes their way to the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Remembrance Ceremony Sept. 17, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. After the motorcade, Vandenberg AFB leadership gave speeches and a ceremonial presentation of the POW/ MIA flag. . Following the ceremony, members across the installation participated in a 24-hour walk or ruck while carrying the POW/ MIA flag, as well as a continuous 24-hour name reading of the past and current POW/MIA members, until the closing ceremony the next day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Scott Bailey, 30th Space Wing historian, gives a speech during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Closing Ceremony Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The first POW/MIA ceremony was held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., after becoming an official recognition day in 1979. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, roughly 83,114 Americans from over five wars are missing in action, and 16,837 Americans died as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Scott Bailey, 30th Space Wing historian, gives a speech during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Closing Ceremony Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The first POW/MIA ceremony was held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., after becoming an official recognition day in 1979. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, roughly 83,114 Americans from over five wars are missing in action, and 16,837 Americans died as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Col. Kris Barcomb, 30th Operations Group commander, gives final remarks during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Closing Ceremony Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The first POW/MIA ceremony was held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., after becoming an official recognition day in 1979 to honor the struggles of those missing. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, roughly 83,114 Americans from over five wars are missing in action, and 16,837 Americans died as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

Col. Kris Barcomb, 30th Operations Group commander, gives final remarks during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Closing Ceremony Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The first POW/MIA ceremony was held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., after becoming an official recognition day in 1979 to honor the struggles of those missing. According to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, roughly 83,114 Americans from over five wars are missing in action, and 16,837 Americans died as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

30th Space Wing Honor Guard members present the colors during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Closing Ceremony Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The closing ceremony concluded the 24 POW/MIA remembrance events, which included a motorcade, speeches, a 24-hour name reading, and 24-hour walk or ruck signifying the hours that the POW/MIA’s spent surviving or devising plans to escape. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

30th Space Wing Honor Guard members present the colors during the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Closing Ceremony Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The closing ceremony concluded the 24 POW/MIA remembrance events, which included a motorcade, speeches, a 24-hour name reading, and 24-hour walk or ruck signifying the hours that the POW/MIA’s spent surviving or devising plans to escape. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

The ‘Missing Man Table’ sits at the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Closing Ceremony Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Each detail of the table symbolizes an aspect of the POW/MIA’s life or fate, or of those whom they left behind. During many formal United States Air Force events, this table is displayed to signify those who are missing but are not forgotten. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

The ‘Missing Man Table’ sits at the Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Closing Ceremony Sept. 18, 2020, at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Each detail of the table symbolizes an aspect of the POW/MIA’s life or fate, or of those whom they left behind. During many formal United States Air Force events, this table is displayed to signify those who are missing but are not forgotten. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hanah Abercrombie)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --