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Vandenberg brings children to work

Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Kolise, 30th Security Forces Squadron standards and evaluation, takes his daughters, Terineise and Fiasili, to work during Take Your Child to Work day, April 27, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Take Your Child to Work Day gives military youth an opportunity to see what their parents contribute to the space and missile mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jim Araos/Released)

Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Kolise, 30th Security Forces Squadron standards and evaluation, takes his daughters, Terineise and Fiasili, to work during Take Your Child to Work day, April 27, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Take Your Child to Work Day gives military youth an opportunity to see what their parents contribute to the space and missile mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jim Araos/Released)

Jay Prichard, Vandenberg Space and Missile Technology Center director, teaches Vandenberg launch history during the SAMTEC Rocket Building Event, April 27, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Take Your Child to Work Day is the first annual trial of the program, which gives military youth an opportunity to see what their parents contribute to the space and missile mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Clayton A. Wear/Released)

Jay Prichard, Vandenberg Space and Missile Technology Center director, teaches Vandenberg launch history during the SAMTEC Rocket Building Event, April 27, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Take Your Child to Work Day is the first annual trial of the program, which gives military youth an opportunity to see what their parents contribute to the space and missile mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Clayton A. Wear/Released)

Staff Sgt. Matthew Baker, 30th Medical Group diagnostic imaging technician, shows children training X-ray images during Take Your Child to Work Day, April 27, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Take Your Child to Work Day is the first annual trial of the program, which gives military youth an opportunity to see what their parents contribute to the space and missile mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Robert J. Volio/Released)

Staff Sgt. Matthew Baker, 30th Medical Group diagnostic imaging technician, shows children training X-ray images during Take Your Child to Work Day, April 27, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Take Your Child to Work Day is the first annual trial of the program, which gives military youth an opportunity to see what their parents contribute to the space and missile mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Robert J. Volio/Released)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

Vandenberg Airmen brought their children to work to witness, and experience, what their parents do in the Air Force during Take Your Child to Work Day, here, July 27.

Take Your Child to Work Day gives children an opportunity to see what their parents contribute to the space and missile mission.

“We want to show the technical side of the mission by going through the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics,” said Capt. Kenneth Bull, 1st Air and Space Test Squadron mission support flight commander. “We’ve got it set up where kids see the exciting side of what their parents do.”

Group and squadron level events were hosted throughout the day to display the specialties of military parents.

“It’s a good opportunity for the young ones to see what we are doing out here on a daily basis to launch stuff into space,” said Master Sgt. Jeremy Howard, 30th Contracting Squadron superintendent. “This gives them a better idea of what is going on, instead of 'daddy or mommy goes to work and I have no idea what they do.’ It just helps connect them to the mission and bring them into the Air Force family.”

 

As an additional event, youths visited the Space and Missile Technology Center for a paper rocket building activity.

“The activity is designed to take children from the beginning concept of designing a rocket to flying the rocket,” said Bull. “It’s just a fun, hands-on way of doing it.”

The event’s goal was to educate and possibly inspire the next generation of Airmen.

“Children are curious about what their parents do,” said Bull. “Parents talk to them about it, but this is an opportunity for them to see it. You never know what will fascinate them and drive them into the future.”