IG visits Vandenberg AFB

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launches during an operational test at 11:01 p.m. PST here, Feb. 25, 2016. Col. J. Christopher Moss, 30th Space Wing commander, was the launch decision authority (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jim Araos/Released).

An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile launches during an operational test at 11:01 p.m. PST here, Feb. 25, 2016. Col. J. Christopher Moss, 30th Space Wing commander, was the launch decision authority (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jim Araos/Released).

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- In addition to the Minuteman III launch, Vandenberg Air Force Base was recently visited by the Air Force Space Command Inspector General conducting an on-site inspection.

The focus of the on-site visit was to observe the 30th Space Wing launch support activities, using a new inspection system which was implemented in 2013.

"The new Air Force Inspection System and Commander Inspection Program are designed to give commanders more control over manpower and resources," said Master Sgt. Joseph Williams, 30th Space Wing IG superintendent. "Under previous inspection systems, commanders were reliant on outside organizations to validate mission readiness and compliance of a unit. This drove units to spend many hours on inspection preparation leaving very little time for commanders to focus on mission readiness or compliance consistently."

The new inspection system gives commanders the resources and tools to assess and manage their own mission readiness and compliance.

"Units are held accountable for what they control," said Williams. "The goal is to go from inspection preparation to a day-to-day mission assurance readiness and compliance mindset - being honest with ourselves and our leadership on the actual status of the unit, program or work center."

This streamlined approach categorizes inspections into one of four categories eliminating numerous separate inspections.

"The four inspection levels are Management Inspections, Unit Effectiveness Inspections, Commanders Inspection Program, and Individual Reporting," said Williams. "It is at the individual reporting level where our experts performing their jobs are in the best position to report honestly about what is working and what's not."

The success of the wing's CCIP resides with everyone working together to bring awareness.

"Supervisors at all levels should fully embrace and understand AFIS and CCIP to better support our younger Airmen," said Williams. "It's our responsibility to make them understand their roll in AFIS and CCIP - building a strong foundation for us and those that come after us."

Vandenberg welcomed Headquarters Air Force Space Command Inspector General, Col. Keith Balts, to oversee the recent inspection. 

"This particular three-day on-site visit focused on the wing's primary launch mission, the GT-218 Minuteman III test launch," said Balts. "The team also assessed parts of the 30th Launch Group's Mission Assurance function, the wing's Commander's Inspection Program and progress on deficiencies identified during the AFSPC IGs last visit to Vandenberg AFB."

Despite the recent implementation of the new inspection system, wings are readily adapting.

"As I travel throughout the command, I am incredibly impressed by the progress wings have made in embracing the new inspection system," said Balts. "Transitions of this magnitude take five to 10 years to fully take shape, but I see progress on every inspection and in every unit. That's a direct result of strong leadership and dedicated Airmen who have an intense desire to improve the readiness of their unique part of the Air Force mission."